Comments (4)

  1. Wow, Anne, there is so much gold in this exchange. THIS is as much a parenting article as it is one for education! Well done for highlighting the genius in an otherwise ordinary exchange. Brilliant!

  2. trishrobbins4@gmail.com' Trish Robbins says:

    Hi Anne I really enjoyed reading this exchange of conversation – it brought a smile to my face visualising the fun they were having together. As a ece teacher now working in a foundation room at a primary school, I now have a greater understanding of the importance of oral language. Thanks for sharing this blog.

  3. zankerh@mthutt.school.nz' Hugo says:

    Thank you, Ann! This one is definitely one for parents as well as teachers!

  4. rose.t@nbcp.org.nz' Rose Turvey says:

    Hi Ann, I loved reading this! I think i’ll share this with my team this week as I know they will also appreciate reading it too. I totally agree with James Britton’s proposition that ‘reading and writing float on a sea of talk’ and that confident and competent readers and writers have to first become competent talkers and listeners. From my action research this year, the most valuable learning times have been in smaller groups or one on one where conversations have happened during children’s play, reading a book, using my nursery rhyme song box, or just through random chats. I also agree when you said, “give at least as much attention to the quality of adult-child talk and conversation in your practice, professional learning and discussions, as you give to things like alphabets, narrative assessment and planning activities.” So true! Makes me think more about the value of adult-child conversations in my preschool and how I can encourage children to become competent talkers and listeners through the conversations we have.

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