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The School that Story built

The stories that circulate in and around a school paint a picture of the school’s culture and values, heroes and enemies, good points and bad, animating the actions and intentions of leaders, teachers, students, whānau and community. By creating and sharing our stories, we define “who we are”. Our identity is intricately woven into the
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“If you don’t lead with small data, you’ll be led by Big Data”

Derek Wenmoth reflects on Pasi Sahlberg’s uLearn18 keynote address. The keynote address by renowned Finnish academic and author, Pasi Sahlberg on day two of the uLearn18 conference may best be summed up as providing a warning and a call to action. While many in the audience were expecting to hear stories of how progressive the
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Preparing the next generation for the algorithmic age

James Hopkins summarises Mike Walsh’s uLearn18 keynote address and interviews Mike. What does the future mean to the education industry? Futurists tend to get a bad wrap because they often make technological predictions. Mike Walsh argues that successfully predicting the future is more about paying attention to people, not the technology in their lives. While in
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Tō reo ki te raki, tō mana ki te whenua

Hohepa Isaac-Sharland reflects on Hana O’Regan’s uLearn18 keynote. ‘Tō reo ki te raki, tō mana ki te whenua’ Let your story be heard in the heavens, and your mana be restored to the land (2018, O’Regan) Kia piki taku rau huia ki ngā tihi tapu o taku pae a Tararua, e rere whakarunga ki te ūpoko
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Words, words, words

Ko tōu reo, ko tōku reo, te tuakiri tangata. Tīhei uriuri, tīhei nakonako. Your voice and my voice are expressions of identity. May our descendants live on and our hopes be fulfilled. (Learning Languages Whakataukī, NZC 2007) We language our world and ourselves into being. We have ideas. We think thoughts. We express these things
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Two free time tools that I use everyday

My first job out of University was writing and performing comedy for a television show. On the whole it was as enjoyable as it sounds – mainly due to the people I worked with: Hori Ahipene, Lyndee-Jane Rutherford, Rawiri Paratene, Dave Fane, Dave Armstrong, Cal Wilson, Raybon Kan, Jemaine Clement, Oscar Kightley, Pip Hall, Paul
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How to swim naked in the goldfish bowl

  It is a small world. Aotearoa-New Zealand is even smaller. The education sector is a subset of both. The good thing (and the challenge) of working in a goldfish bowl like education is that you really can’t hide, everyone pretty much knows everyone else. This has some real implications for educators. In this post
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Be neotenous: The importance of curiosity for teachers

“Brown paper packages tied up with strings / These are a few of my favourite things…” Oscar Hammerstein, Richard Rodgers, 1965 I put the gift bag in the centre of the table. While the handles were tied together with ribbon, you could still see variously-shaped packages, wrapped in innocuous brown paper, peeking out. Like five-year-olds
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Manaakitanga

He tangata takahi manuhiri, he marae puehu A person who mistreats his guest has a dusty marae (the marae is an open area in front of the meeting house, and sometimes includes buildings) Or in a non marae context: “A lack of hospitality shown to others is a reflection on us all” In this post

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