Comments (5)

  1. phoebe.davis@core-ed.ac.nz' Phebs says:

    Ngā mihi Manu 

    I know the carvings spoke to you in their own unique way…

    O le gagana e tasi e le lava

    Phebs

    1. Faafetai lava Phebs,

      It was a very special moment sitting in that upper marae. I am always attuned to the voices of those who have gone before.  

  2. Kia ora Manu, talofa lava.

    One of the things that your post highlights, and that we try to do in the whānau Māori/Pasifika space, is to understand the importance of who we are and where we are from, as Māori. To know the history of our tūpuna, their trials and tribulations, their footsteps left in the sand, is to know ourselves.  To understand what has shaped us to be as we are today. 

    It is a common presumption that a person who presents as Māori,  also has reo, knowledge, tikanga and kawa. This is not always so.  The whānau space within CORE allows us to expand our horizons and understandings of others as well as ourselves.  The place of Pasifika people in the Treaty is clearly as Tangata Tiriti – the Māori worldview exists on whakapapa and geneology – Te Moana Nui A-Kiwa holds a special place for Māori, and in Māori thinking.  

    I really appreciate and enjoy reading your musings and reflections post whānau hui.  Ngā manaakitanga.

    1. Malo lava De,

      I totally agree with the sentiments you have shared.  Part of the reason why I have loved the privilege that such an opportunity of attending whānau hui allows me to do, is to be immersed in the tikanga and kawa of each marae we have stayed in, as well as understand what the important issues Māori face in Aotearoa.

      Speaking of musings. . . a few years ago in November 2013, I wrote a blog post called "Looking beyond the haka – humble musings of a Samoan observer" that attempted to explore the various different and complex layers of what it means to be Māori in Aotearoa.  I would love to hear what your thoughts are about this blog post too.  At the time I didn't know it, but I was interested in "identity construction and identity formation" which has since evolved in my iterative thinking and it will now form part of the foundation of what I am writing in my PhD thesis about identity politics.

      Manuia le aso,

      Aiono Manu

  3. kathe.tp@core-ed.org' Kathe Tawhiwhirangi says:

    Pai rawa Manu

    Loved your story :-)

     

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