Comments (6)

  1. principal@marshland.school.nz' Jacqui says:

    Brilliant Mark! Thanks so much for this timely reminder. Interesting how things havent really changed that much! Many children will quietly look as if they are working purposefully and yet are away doing their own thing that obviously motivates them much more than the task set by the teachers. It seems worse if they are actually on an inappropriate site, but really what’s changed?
    Aside from the cyber safety things you mention, the things you recommend in your post arn’t new. They demonstrate quality teaching! The power of roaming is understated!! If a teacher has their own head in their laptop during learning what message is that sending? Also stopping to check regulalrly : Are all the children engaged? If not, what can I as a teacher do about it? Change the programme! Questioning and feedback = absolutely vital.
    Thanks for keeping it real and reminding us that quality teaching pre digital technology inclusion is really no different to traditional teaching. Your job as a teacher is even more important that ever in my opinion. Don’t leave it to technology to do it for you!

    1. Mark Maddren says:

      Thank you very much for your feedback Jacqui, I agree that quality teaching and learning is key to everything. Devices, blogging, researching online etc without this will have little impact. Technology definitely turbo charges teaching and learning, however, only when a number of strategies and systems to support visibility are being utilised by the teacher.

  2. cara.taylor@belfast.school.nz' Cara says:

    Such useful stuff Mark. I really liked what YMS students/teacher did with the learning spaces too. I was intrigued by just how many spaces they had to be utilised. I imagine we just have to think outside the box and if not staring us straight in the eye then be flexible in allowing students to create opportunities for learning spaces. One strategy I use to use when I had group rotations or workshops was instead of having groups come to me I would go to them. This allowed the group I was working with to continue to work without any disruption to their learning, a few minutes for my next group to prepare themselves for me before I got to them and a chance to touch base/rove to check in on those who were working around the room (checking they were on task, on track and progressing and give feedback). Sometimes if a student was off task my presence of close proximity without saying a word was enough – non verbals always worked well for anyone up to a little ‘mischief’. I also found moving to a group cause way less noise disruption and issues with equipment etc as I would take my basket where I went that had everything needed in it!! Look forward to reading others strategies :)

    1. Mark Maddren says:

      I really enjoyed your feedback and even used your strategy when working in a hub today. I am sure Yaldhurst Model School would not mind if you wanted to visit their Yr 7/8 learning space. It is a converted library so definitely has some brilliant spaces.

  3. kath.roach@stfrancischch.school.nz' Kath Roach says:

    Mark, the questions you pose are so relevent for our team as we strive to create an engaging learning environment for our Year 5/6 students in an innovative learning space. The immediate challenges for me are balancing student choice with ensuring they are making good decisions online and creating opportunities for deep thinking, questioning and engagement while covering curriculum requirements.

  4. dave.winter@manaiakalani.org' Dave says:

    Hey Mark again a reference to how things have changed and what may go wrong if don’t realise, think things through and respond to our new place and our new times. When you made your pen launcher (something thousands of us did) your results were contained in your physical space your methods conveyed to others by folklaw, meetups with the cousins and general word of mouth. The strategies you mention are great. I wonder if there is another one possible being the development of stronger learner dispositions lead by strong facilitation of classroom culture etc. Yet another example of where we want our young people to not be deprived of youth and innocence and yet to be more able than we ever were at their age. #Cybersmart4life
    Thanks for sharing and hosting this important conversation

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