Comments (10)

  1. girlwonder@slingshot.co.nz' Stacey says:

    Thanks so much for supporting Teachers! My suggestion for parents to help support their child's teacher is to remind the child that their teacher is an actual 'person' and not a mythical being put on the earth with unlimited patience and good humour. It seems simple, but basic manners go a long way. If a teacher could spend less time 'managing' classroom behaviour and more time teaching, then EVERYONE would benefit. That would be wonderful. It sounds obvious and very old-fashioned I know…but there is my 2 cents. 

    1. Rochelle Savage says:

      Thanks Stacey and thanks for your comments. I think it’s nice if we run into my sons’ teachers in the weekends and we have stopped to chat briefly as that definitely helps with what you mention – my boys see them out of school, with interests and families and a life!

  2. nickylotz@hotmail.com' Nicky Lotz says:

    Hi Rochelle,

    This is awesome :) please can I share it on Facebook!!!

    1. Rochelle Savage says:

      Hi Nicky,

      Thanks, I appreciate your kind words and taking the time to read it. You’re welcome to share it on facebook – it feels like the perfect time to appreciate teachers!

  3. kohalloran@amberley.school.nz' Kev O'Halloran says:

    Love your article Rochelle, and what a background you have with your mum to be able to offer such worthwhile and insightful advice – would you  be OK if I shared parts of your blog in term 1 newsletters next year? Roll on the hols I say, cheers Kev

    1. Rochelle Savage says:

      Hi Kev,

      Thank you and you are welcome to share it in the newsletter – I’m glad it can be a worthwhile resource. Have an excellent holiday – well deserved. Thanks.

  4. Renee says:

    Great post Rochelle. I am neither a teacher, nor a parent, but several of my close friends are both. One, who was a teacher (now a parent), went through a very difficult time with parents being critical of her, doubting her expertise, and talking to her superiors without raising their concerns with her directly (I think much of this had to do with her age and the fact that she looked even younger). She experienced a severe bout of depression as a result of this, which made me really sad because she's a lovely person, and 'her kids' loved her. Your Mum sounds like a real Superwoman, but not everyone, especially those new to the profession, will have her experience or the confidence to back themselves as much as they should. So parents, be kind to your child's teacher… as Stacey said, they're actual human beings too.

    1. Rochelle Savage says:

      Thanks Renee. Part of wanting to write this post was to try and see how we can all support each other as we all want the same thing – excellent, engaging education for the children involved. I agree to be kind to one another is so important plus we need to realise that each teacher will have unique skills. Experienced teachers have life skills and knowledge to draw on but new and young teachers often bring fresh ideas (not that experienced teachers don’t, it’s more to point out there are always positives for whichever teacher your child gets). 

  5. Rebbecca says:

    Love this post Rochelle – I will share via social media too. I want to echo others' thanks to you for respecting teachers! Another thought I had is that instead of harshly criticizing a teacher (as Renee points out above – I have heard similar stories), parents could prioritise becoming a real part of their child's school life, whether it be via the class blog and weekend activities for working parents, or school camps and helping during the day for non-working parents or parents who can afford to take leave. Your child's education is hugely important so showing a serious interest in it will help your child a lot! :) 

    1. Rochelle Savage says:

      Tēnā rawa atu koe Rebecca! You have a great point – the easiest way for a parent to encourage and support their child with their education is be involved with the school and this can take so many forms: the PTA (most of us on it at my children’s school work full or part-time, but we see how valuable the extra funding is); school trips (so valued as trips would not be able to happen without parent volunteers); working bees; school camp parents; coaching debating teams; board of trustees and more. 

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